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Genomic profiling reveals that transient adipogenic activation is a hallmark of mouse models of skeletal muscle regeneration.

Lukjanenko, Laura and Brachat, Sophie and Pierrel, Eliane and Trifilieff, Estelle and Feige, Jerome (2013) Genomic profiling reveals that transient adipogenic activation is a hallmark of mouse models of skeletal muscle regeneration. PLoS ONE, 8 (8). p. 71084. ISSN 1932-6203

Official URL: http://www.plosone.org/

Abstract

The marbling of skeletal muscle by ectopic adipose tissue is a hallmark of many muscle diseases, including sarcopenia and muscular dystrophies, and generally associates with impaired muscle regeneration. Although the etiology and the molecular mechanisms of ectopic adipogenesis are poorly understood, fatty regeneration can be modeled in mice using glycerol-induced muscle damage. Using comprehensive molecular and histological profiling, we compared glycerol-induced fatty regeneration to the classical cardiotoxin (CTX)-induced regeneration model previously believed to lack an adipogenic response in muscle. Surprisingly, ectopic adipogenesis was detected in both models, but was stronger and more persistent in response to glycerol. Importantly, extensive differential transcriptomic profiling demonstrated that glycerol induces a stronger inflammatory response, and promotes adipogenic regulatory networks while reducing fatty acid β-oxidation. Altogether, these results provide a comprehensive repository of gene expression changes during the time course of two muscle regeneration models, and strongly suggest that adipogenic commitment is a hallmark of muscle regeneration, which can lead to ectopic adipocyte accumulation in response to specific physiopathological challenges

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Skeletal muscle, regeneration, ectopic adipogenesis
Date Deposited: 12 Oct 2016 00:45
Last Modified: 12 Oct 2016 00:45
URI: https://oak.novartis.com/id/eprint/9672

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