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The global circulation of seasonal influenza A (H3N2) viruses.

Russell, Colin A and Jones, Terri and Barr, Ian G and Cox, Nancy J and Garten, Rebecca J and Gregory, Vicky and Gust, Ian D and Hampson, Alan W and Hay, Alan J and Hurt, Aeron C and de Jong, Jan C and Kelso, Anne and Klimov, Alexander I and Kageyama, Tsutomu and Komadina, Naomi and Lapedes, Alan S and Lin, Yi P and Mosterin, Ana and Obuchi, Masatsugu and Odagiri, Takato and Osterhaus, Albert D M E and Rimmelzwaan, Guus F and Shaw, Michael W and Skepner, Eugene and Stohr, Klaus and Tashiro, Masato and Fouchier, Ron A M and Smith, Derek J (2008) The global circulation of seasonal influenza A (H3N2) viruses. Science (New York, N.Y.), 320 (5874). pp. 340-346. ISSN 1095-9203

Abstract

Antigenic and genetic analysis of the hemagglutinin of approximately 13,000 human influenza A (H3N2) viruses from six continents during 2002-2007 revealed that there was continuous circulation in east and Southeast Asia (E-SE Asia) via a region-wide network of temporally overlapping epidemics and that epidemics in the temperate regions were seeded from this network each year. Seed strains generally first reached Oceania, North America, and Europe, and later South America. This evidence suggests that once A (H3N2) viruses leave E-SE Asia, they are unlikely to contribute to long-term viral evolution. If the trends observed during this period are an accurate representation of overall patterns of spread, then the antigenic characteristics of A (H3N2) viruses outside E-SE Asia may be forecast each year based on surveillance within E-SE Asia, with consequent improvements to vaccine strain selection.

Item Type: Article
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Additional Information: author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing); On author's personal web site
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Date Deposited: 14 Dec 2009 13:51
Last Modified: 14 Dec 2009 13:51
URI: https://oak.novartis.com/id/eprint/888

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