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Changes in expression of imprinted genes following treatment of human cancer cell lines with non-mutagenic or mutagenic carcinogens.

Shibui, Takeo and Higo, Yukari and Tsutsui, Takeo W and Uchida, Minoru and Oshimura, Mitsuo and Barrett, James and Tsutsui, Takeki (2008) Changes in expression of imprinted genes following treatment of human cancer cell lines with non-mutagenic or mutagenic carcinogens. International Journal of Oncology, 33 (2). pp. 351-360. ISSN 1019-6439

Abstract

It remains possible that chemicals that act by mutagenic mechanisms as well as chemicals that do not induce gene mutations may affect epigenetic gene expression. To test the possibility, we investigated the ability of both types of chemicals to alter the expression of five imprinted genes, PEG3, SNRPN, NDN, ZAC and H19, using two human colon cancer cell lines and a human breast cancer cell line. The expression of imprinted genes was changed by some non-mutagenic and mutagenic carcinogens independent of their mutagenic activity. The genes most commonly exhibiting the changes in expression were SNRPN and PEG3. Alterations of the expression of NDN and ZAC were also observed in some conditions. Methylation-specific PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays suggest the possibility that changes in the expression of SNRPN may be associated with DNA hypomethylation and histone acetylation of the promoters and euchromatinization of the heterochromatic domains of the promoters. Changes in expression of the imprinted genes, PEG3 and NDN, were also observed in cells immortalized by treatment of normal human fibroblasts with 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide or aflatoxin B1. We previously demonstrated that expression of the cancer-related gene, INK4a, in these immortal cells was lost via epigenetic mechanisms. The results prove that, in cancer cells, some mutagenic or non-mutagenic carcinogens can epigenetically influence the transcription levels of imprinted genes and also suggest the possibility that some chemical carcinogens may have epigenetic carcinogenic effects in human cells.

Item Type: Article
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Date Deposited: 14 Dec 2009 13:55
Last Modified: 14 Dec 2009 13:55
URI: https://oak.novartis.com/id/eprint/691

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