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Pharmacokinetics of the angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor, benazepril, and its active metabolite, benazeprilat, in dog.

King, J N and Maurer, Melanie and Morrison, Christopher Alan and Mauron, C and Kaiser, Guenther (1997) Pharmacokinetics of the angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitor, benazepril, and its active metabolite, benazeprilat, in dog. Xenobiotica; the fate of foreign compounds in biological systems, 27 (8). pp. 819-829. ISSN 0049-8254

Abstract

1. The pharmacokinetics of the angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitor benazepril were evaluated in eight healthy Beagle dogs. Benazepril was administered orally at a dosage of 7.5 mg (about 0.5 mg/kg) both as a single dose and then once daily for 14 consecutive days. The prodrug, benazepril, and its active metabolite, benazeprilat, were measured in plasma using a gas chromatography mass-spectrometry method with mass-selective detection. 2. Benazepril appeared quickly in the plasma (tmax 0.5 h) and was rapidly eliminated by metabolism to benazeprilat. Peak benazeprilat concentrations were attained later (tmax 1.25 h) and declined biphasically with a rapid elimination phase (t1/2 lambda 1 1.1 and 1.7 h after single and the last repeated dose respectively) followed by a terminal elimination phase (t1/2 lambda z 11.7 and 19.0 h after single and repeated dose respectively). The mean residence time for benazeprilat was 15.2 h after the single dose and 17.4 h after the 14th dose. 3. Repeated administration of benazepril produced moderate bioaccumulation of benazeprilat; the ratio of AUC[0-->24 h]'s after the 14th dose as compared with the single dose was 1.47, equivalent to a half-life for accumulation (t1/2acc) of 14.6 h. Steady-state benazeprilat concentrations at peak (Cmax) and trough (Cmin) were reached within three doses. 4. The pharmacodynamics of benazepril were assessed by measurement of plasma ACE activity. After both single doses and at steady-state, benazepril produced inhibition of ACE activity in all dogs that was maximal at peak effect (Emax = 100%) and long-lasting (> 85% inhibition was present at 24 h). The long duration of action of benazepril on plasma ACE is due to the presence of the terminal elimination phase of benazeprilat, even though most of the metabolite is rapidly eliminated from the plasma.

Item Type: Article
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Date Deposited: 31 Jan 2012 00:45
Last Modified: 01 Feb 2013 00:45
URI: https://oak.novartis.com/id/eprint/6612

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