Browse views: by Year, by Function, by GLF, by Subfunction, by Conference, by Journal

Impaired cognitive performance in rats after complete epithalamus lesions, but not after pinealectomy alone.

Lecourtier, Lucas and Saboureau, Michel and Kelly, Christopher D and Pévet, Paul and Kelly, Peter (2005) Impaired cognitive performance in rats after complete epithalamus lesions, but not after pinealectomy alone. Behavioural Brain Research, 161 (2). pp. 276-285. ISSN 0166-4328

Abstract

In the midbrain, the epithalamus comprises the habenular nuclei and the pineal gland. Based on evidence including imaging studies in schizophrenia patients, several investigators have postulated that dysfunction of this structure is causally involved in symptoms of schizophrenia. Recently, we showed that bilateral habenula lesions in the rat induced some schizophrenia-like behavioural changes, namely memory and attention impairments, but unaltered social interaction in a brief encounter and prepulse inhibition (PPI) of the startle reflex. Here, the possible involvement of the pineal gland in the same behaviours was assessed, by examining them in two series of experiments. In the first, these behaviours were examined in pinealectomized rats compared to sham-operated controls. In the second, they were examined in rats with combined lesion of habenula plus pinealectomy compared to sham-operated controls, to examine whether pinealectomy induced further deficits when combined with habenula damage. Lesions of habenula were confirmed histologically and neurochemically by reduction of choline acetyltransferase in the interpeduncular nucleus. Pinealectomy was confirmed post mortem by careful visual inspection. Pinealectomy induced no deficits in any test, while combined lesions led to the same pattern of deficits as previously observed after habenula lesion, i.e. marked memory impairment in the Morris water maze without affecting the amount of social interaction or PPI of the startle reflex. Thus, loss of pineal function causes no deficits in these behaviours and does not alter the qualitative pattern of deficits resulting from habenula damage.

Item Type: Article
Related URLs:
Additional Information: author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing); Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
Keywords: Pineal gland; Habenular nuclei; Morris maze; Spatial memory; Social interaction; Prepulse inhibition; Schizophrenia
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 14 Dec 2009 13:56
Last Modified: 14 Dec 2009 13:56
URI: https://oak.novartis.com/id/eprint/632

Search

Email Alerts

Register with OAK to receive email alerts for saved searches.