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Global down-regulation of gene expression in the brain using RNA interference, with emphasis on monoamine transporters and GPCRs: implications for target characterization in psychiatric and neurological disorders.

Hoyer, Daniel and Thakker, Deepak and Natt, Francois and Maier, Rainer and Huesken, Dieter and Mueller, Matthias and Flor, Peter Josef and Van Der Putten, P. Herman and Schmutz, Markus and Bilbe, Graeme and Cryan, John F. (2006) Global down-regulation of gene expression in the brain using RNA interference, with emphasis on monoamine transporters and GPCRs: implications for target characterization in psychiatric and neurological disorders. Journal of Receptor and Signal Transduction Research, 26 (5-6). pp. 527-547. ISSN 1079-9893

Abstract

RNA interference (RNAi) is a natural mechanism for regulating gene expression, which exists in plants, invertebrates, and mammals. We investigated whether non-viral infusion of short interfering RNA (siRNA) by the intracerebroventricular route would enable a sequence-specific gene knockdown in the mouse brain and whether the knockdown translates into disease-relevant behavioral changes. Initially, we targeted enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in mice overexpressing EGFP. A selective knockdown of both EGFP protein and mRNA was observed throughout the brain, with lesser down-regulation in regions distal to the infusion site. We then targeted endogenous genes, encoding the dopamine (DAT) and serotonin transporters (SERT). DAT-siRNA infusion in adult mice produced a significant down-regulation of DAT mRNA and protein and elicited hyperlocomotion similar, but delayed, to that produced on infusion of GBR-12909, a potent and selective DAT inhibitor. Similarly, SERT-siRNA infusion resulted in significant knockdown of SERT mRNA and protein and elicited reduced immobility in the forced swim test similar to that obtained on infusion of citalopram, a very selective and potent SSRI. Application of this non-viral RNAi approach may accelerate target validation for neuropsychiatric disorders that involve a complex interplay of gene(s) from various brain regions.

Item Type: Article
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Additional Information: author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing); 12 month embargo for STM Journals ; 18 month embargo for SSH journals; Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used; Must link to publisher version
Keywords: RNAinterference; Anxiety; Depression; Forced swim test; Locomotor activity; GBR12099; Citalopram; In vivo; Dopamine and serotonin transporters
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Date Deposited: 14 Dec 2009 13:57
Last Modified: 31 Jan 2013 01:13
URI: https://oak.novartis.com/id/eprint/566

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