Browse views: by Year, by Function, by GLF, by Subfunction, by Conference, by Journal

A dual role of Irf1 in maintaining epithelial identity but also enabling EMT and metastasis formation of breast cancer cells.

Meyer-Schaller, Nathalie and Tiede, Stefanie and Ivanek, Robert and Diepenbruck, Maren and Christofori, Gerhard (2020) A dual role of Irf1 in maintaining epithelial identity but also enabling EMT and metastasis formation of breast cancer cells. Oncogene. ISSN 1476-5594

Abstract

An epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an embryonic dedifferentiation program which is aberrantly activated in cancer cells to acquire cellular plasticity. This plasticity increases the ability of breast cancer cells to invade into surrounding tissue, to seed metastasis at distant sites and to resist to chemotherapy. In this study, we have observed a higher expression of interferon-related factors in basal-like and claudin-low subtypes of breast cancer in patients, known to be associated with EMT. Notably, Irf1 exerts essential functions during the EMT process, yet it is also required for the maintenance of an epithelial differentiation status of mammary gland epithelial cells: RNAi-mediated ablation of Irf1 in mammary epithelial cells results in the expression of mesenchymal factors and Smad transcriptional activity. Conversely, ablation of Irf1 during TGFβ-induced EMT prevents a mesenchymal transition and stabilizes the expression of E-cadherin. In the basal-like murine breast cancer cell line 4T1, RNAi-mediated ablation of Irf1 reduces colony formation and cell migration in vitro and shedding of circulating tumor cells and metastasis formation in vivo. This context-dependent dual role of Irf1 in the regulation of epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity provides important new insights into the functional contribution and therapeutic potential of interferon-regulated factors in breast cancer.

Item Type: Article
Date Deposited: 06 Jun 2020 00:45
Last Modified: 06 Jun 2020 00:45
URI: https://oak.novartis.com/id/eprint/42839

Search

Email Alerts

Register with OAK to receive email alerts for saved searches.