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Protein signatures of centenarians and their offspring suggest centenarians age slower than other humans

SEBASTIANI, PAOLA and MONTI, STEFANO and FEDERICO, ANTHONY and Morris, Melody and GURINOVICH, ANASTASIA and TOSHIKO, TANAKA and BHUTKAR, APARNA and ANDERSON, STACY L and FERRUCCI, LUIGI and Glass, David and Jennings, Lori and PERLS, THOMAS T (2021) Protein signatures of centenarians and their offspring suggest centenarians age slower than other humans. Aging Cell. ISSN 14749726

Abstract

Using samples from the New England Centenarian Study (NECS), we sought to characterize the serum proteome of 77 centenarians, 82 centenarians' offspring, and 65 age-matched controls of the offspring (mean ages: 105, 80, and 79 years). We identified 1312 proteins that significantly differ between centenarians and their offspring and controls (FDR < 1%), and two different protein signatures that predict longer survival in centenarians and in younger people. By comparing the centenarian signature with 2 independent proteomic studies of aging, we replicated the association of 484 proteins of aging and we identified two serum protein signatures that are specific of extreme old age. The data suggest that centenarians acquire similar aging signatures as seen in younger cohorts that have short survival periods, suggesting that they do not escape normal aging markers, but rather acquire them much later than usual. For example, centenarian signatures are significantly enriched for senescence-associated secretory phenotypes, consistent with those seen with younger aged individuals, and from this finding, we provide a new list of serum proteins that can be used to measure cellular senescence. Protein co-expression network analysis suggests that a small number of biological drivers may regulate aging and extreme longevity, and that changes in gene regulation may be important to reach extreme old age. This centenarian study thus provides additional signatures that can be used to measure aging and provides specific circulating biomarkers of healthy aging and longevity, suggesting potential mechanisms that could help prolong health and support longevity.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: aging longevity protein senescence SomaLogic
Date Deposited: 26 Feb 2021 00:45
Last Modified: 26 Feb 2021 00:45
URI: https://oak.novartis.com/id/eprint/42602

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