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1H-NMR metabolic profiling of cerebrospinal fluid in patients with complex regional pain syndrome-related dystonia.

Meissner, Axel and van der Plas, Anton A and van Dasselaar, Nick T and Deelder, André M and van Hilten, Jacobus J and Mayboroda, Oleg A (2014) 1H-NMR metabolic profiling of cerebrospinal fluid in patients with complex regional pain syndrome-related dystonia. Pain, 155 (1). pp. 190-196. ISSN 1872-6623

Abstract

In complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS)-related dystonia, compelling evidence points to the involvement of the central nervous system, but the underpinning pathobiology is still unclear. Thus, to enable a hypothesis-free, unbiased view of the problem and to obtain new insight into the pathobiology of dystonia in CRPS, we applied an exploratory metabolomics analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with CRPS-related dystonia. (1)H-NMR spectroscopy in combination with multivariate modeling were used to investigate metabolic profiles of a total of 105 CSF samples collected from patients with CRPS-related dystonia and controls. We found a significantly different metabolic profile of CSF in CRPS patients compared to controls. The differences were already reflected in the first two principal components of the principal component analysis model, which is an indication that the variance associated with CRPS is stronger than variance caused by such classical confounders as gender, age, or individual differences. A supervised analysis generated a strong model pinpointing the most important metabolites contributed to the metabolic signature of patients with CRPS-related dystonia. From the set of identified discriminators, the most relevant metabolites were 2-keto-isovalerate, glucose, glutamine, and lactate, which all showed increased concentrations, and urea, which showed decreased concentration in CRPS subjects. Our findings point at a catabolic state in chronic CRPS patients with dystonia that is likely associated with inflammation.

Item Type: Article
Date Deposited: 11 Mar 2017 00:45
Last Modified: 11 Mar 2017 00:45
URI: https://oak.novartis.com/id/eprint/32434

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