Browse views: by Year, by Function, by GLF, by Subfunction, by Conference, by Journal

Meckel's and condylar cartilages anomalies in achondroplasia result in defective development and growth of the mandible

Biosse Duplan, Martin and Komla-Ebri, Davide and Heuzé, Yann and Estibal, Valentin and Gaudas, Emilie and Kaci, Nabil and Benoist-Lasselin, Catherine and Zerah, Michel and Kramer, Ina and Kneissel, Michaela and Graus Porta, Diana and Di Rocco, Federico and Legeai-Mallet, Laurence (2016) Meckel's and condylar cartilages anomalies in achondroplasia result in defective development and growth of the mandible. Human molecular genetics. ISSN 1460-2083; 0964-6906

Abstract

Activating FGFR3 mutations in human result in achondroplasia (ACH), the most frequent form of dwarfism, where cartilages are severely disturbed causing long bones, cranial base and vertebrae defects. Because mandibular development and growth rely on cartilages that guide or directly participate to the ossification process, we investigated the impact of FGFR3 mutations on mandibular shape, size and position. By using CT scan imaging of ACH children and by analyzing Fgfr3Y367C/+ mice, a model of ACH, we show that FGFR3 gain-of-function mutations lead to structural anomalies of primary (Meckel’s) and secondary (condylar) cartilages of the mandible, resulting in mandibular hypoplasia and dysmorphogenesis. These defects are likely related to a defective chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation and pan-FGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor NVP-BGJ398 corrects Meckel’s and condylar cartilages defects ex vivo. Moreover, we show that low dose of NVP-BGJ398 improves in vivo condyle growth and corrects dysmorphologies in Fgfr3Y367C/+ mice, suggesting that postnatal treatment with NVP-BGJ398 mice might offer a new therapeutic strategy to improve mandible anomalies in ACH and others FGFR3-related disorders.

Item Type: Article
Date Deposited: 24 Mar 2017 00:45
Last Modified: 24 Mar 2017 00:45
URI: https://oak.novartis.com/id/eprint/28724

Search

Email Alerts

Register with OAK to receive email alerts for saved searches.