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Epigenetically repressing human Cytomegalovirus lytic infection and reactivation from latency in THP-1 model by targeting H3K9 and H3K27 histone demethylases

Gan, Xin and Wang, Haifeng and Yu, Yanyan and Yi, Wei and Zhu, Shanshan and Gu, Baohua and Lu, Chris and Li, En and Liang, Yu (2017) Epigenetically repressing human Cytomegalovirus lytic infection and reactivation from latency in THP-1 model by targeting H3K9 and H3K27 histone demethylases. PLoS ONE, 12 (4). ISSN 1932-6203

Abstract

Human Cytomegalovirus (hCMV) infects a broad range of the population and establishes life-long latency in the infected individuals. Periodically the latently infected virus can reactivate and becomes a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised individuals. In latent infection, the viral genome is suppressed in a heterochromatic state and viral gene transcription is silenced. Upon reactivation, the repressive chromatin is remodeled to an active form, allowing viral lytic gene transcription, initiated by the expression of viral Immediate Early (IE) genes. During this process, a number of histone modification enzymes, including histone demethylases (HDMs), play important roles in driving IE expression, but the mechanisms involved are not fully understood. To get a better understanding of these mechanisms, we focused on two HDMs, KDM4 and KDM6, which reverse the repressive histone H3-lysine 9 and lysine 27 methylation, respectively. Our studies show that in lytic infection, both demethylases are important in the activation of viral IE gene expression. Simultaneous disruption of both via genetic or chemical methods leads to severely impaired viral IE gene expression and viral replication. Additionally, in an experimental latency-reactivation model in THP-1 cells, the KDM6 family member JMJD3 is induced upon viral reactivation and its knockdown resulted in reduced IE gene transcription. These findings suggest pharmacological inhibition of these HDMs may potentially block hCMV lytic infection and reactivation, and control the viral infection associated diseases, which are of significant unmet medical needs.

Item Type: Article
Date Deposited: 25 Nov 2017 00:45
Last Modified: 25 Jan 2019 00:45
URI: https://oak.novartis.com/id/eprint/28077

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