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Progression of Alport Kidney Disease in Col4a3 knock out mice is independent of sex or macrophage depletion by clodronate treatment

Kim, Munkyung and Piaia, Alessandro and Shenoy, Neeta and Kagan, David and Gapp, Berangere and Kueng, Benjamin and Weber, Delphine and Dietrich, Bill and Ksiazek, Iwona (2015) Progression of Alport Kidney Disease in Col4a3 knock out mice is independent of sex or macrophage depletion by clodronate treatment. PLoS ONE, 10 (11). ISSN 1932-6203

Abstract

Alport syndrome is a genetic disease of collagen IV (α3, 4, 5) resulting in renal failure. This study was designed to investigate sex-phenotype correlations and evaluate the contribution of macrophage infiltration to disease progression using Col4a3 knock out (Col4a3KO) mice, an established genetic model of autosomal recessive Alport syndrome. No sex differences in the evolution of body mass loss, renal pathology, biomarkers of tubular damage KIM-1 and NGAL, or deterioration of kidney function were observed during the life span of Col4a3KO mice. These findings confirm that, similar to human autosomal recessive Alport syndrome, female and male Col4a3KO mice develop renal failure at the same age and with similar severity. The specific contribution of macrophage infiltration to Alport disease, one of the prominent features of the disease in human and Col4a3KO mice, remains unknown. This study shows that depletion of kidney macrophages in Col4a3KO male mice by administration of clodronate liposomes, prior to clinical onset of disease and throughout the study period, does not protect the mice from renal failure and interstitial fibrosis, nor delay disease progression. These results suggest that therapy targeting macrophage recruitment to kidney is unlikely to be effective as treatment of Alport syndrome.

Item Type: Article
Date Deposited: 22 Nov 2017 00:45
Last Modified: 25 Jan 2019 00:45
URI: https://oak.novartis.com/id/eprint/25128

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