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Race/ethnic variation in serum levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 in US adults.

Berrigan, David and Potischman, Nancy and Dodd, Kevin W and Hursting, Stephen D and Lavigne, Jackie and Barrett, James and Ballard-Barbash, Rachel (2009) Race/ethnic variation in serum levels of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 in US adults. Growth Hormone & IGF Research: official journal of the Growth Hormone Research Society and the International IGF Research Society, 19 (2). pp. 146-155. ISSN 1532-2238

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The IGF axis plays a significant role in normal growth and development and variation in IGFs is associated with health outcomes. Past studies report variation in IGF levels among race/ethnic groups known to differ in disease incidence. This paper reports on race/ethnic variation in serum levels of IGF-I and IGF-BP3 in a nationally representative and ethnically diverse sample of US adults. DESIGN: Serum IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels from the fasting subsample (n = 6061) of respondents to the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III (NHANES III) were analyzed using an IGF-I ELISA (Diagnostic Systems Laboratory (DSL) 10-5600) and an IGFBP-3 IRMA (DSL 6600). The NHANES is a combined examination and interview survey of a nationally representative sample of US adults. Regression analyses were used to estimate cross-sectional associations between the IGF axis and demographic variables. RESULTS: In unadjusted analyses, serum IGF-I levels were higher in males than in females, and IGFBP-3 levels were higher in females than in males. Both analytes were lower in older adults. Univariate analyses indicate that serum levels of IGF-I are lower in female Non-Hispanic Whites (NHW) (256 [4.9]) and Hispanics (249 [6.6]) than in Non-Hispanic Blacks (NHB) (281 [4.9]). However, in males, IGF levels in NHWs (287 [3.6]) and NHBs (284 [4.3]) are similar and levels in Mexican-Americans are only moderately reduced (265 [3.4]). Notably, NHB's have the highest molar ratio of IGF-I:IGFBP-3 at all ages. After adjustment for age and BMI, gender and race/ethnicity differences persist. CONCLUSIONS: These cross-sectional data support exploration of the IGF axis as an explanation for some race/ethnic differences in cancer incidence.

Item Type: Article
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Additional Information: Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing); Publisher's version/PDF cannot be used
Keywords: Cancer; Insulin-like growth factor; Race/ethnicity; Age
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Date Deposited: 22 Feb 2010 11:50
Last Modified: 22 Feb 2010 11:50
URI: https://oak.novartis.com/id/eprint/1740

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